News

Cartoon Villains, Stress, and Health: Kim and The Donald

By Daniel P. Keating Ph.D. on September 20, 2017 in Stressful Lives
The war of words: "fire and fury" and "sea of flames" may be empty threats (we hope), but even so, the stress from fear and uncertainty will harm health for years to come.

Praising Children May Encourage Them to Cheat

By David Ludden Ph.D. on September 20, 2017 in Talking Apes
Praise is important for emotional growth. But new research shows that the way praise is worded—even for three-year-olds—can have a significant impact on their moral choices.

Dogs Who Live with Smokers May Suffer from Premature Aging

By Stanley Coren Ph.D., F.R.S.C. on September 19, 2017 in Canine Corner
Biomarkers show that living in a home with a tobacco smoker prematurely ages dogs at a cellular level

The Neurobiology of Fear-Based Learning—and Unlearning

By Christopher Bergland on September 19, 2017 in The Athlete's Way
A new study identifies how the brain learns and unlearns fear.
Daniel Oldis, used with permission

Animating Dreams and the Future of Dream Recording

By Michelle Carr Ph.D. on September 18, 2017 in Dream Factory
A proof of concept study explores muscle signals during sleep to recreate an animated dream avatar.

Right Brain and Left Brain Share Duties On "As Needed" Basis

By Christopher Bergland on September 17, 2017 in The Athlete's Way
Growing evidence debunks the myth of creativity being seated in the "right brain." A new Duke study illuminates how the left brain and right brain can share duties when necessary.

iPhone X: Yes Or No?

By Susan Weinschenk Ph.D. on September 16, 2017 in Brain Wise
Whether or not you buy the new iPhone X depends in part on whether you are making a habit based decision or a value based decision.

Conservatism Predicts Lapses Back to Meat Consumption

By Gordon Hodson Ph.D. on September 15, 2017 in Without Prejudice
Although those on the right eat more meat in general, some nonetheless attempt to quit. New research provides insights into why they may struggle.

What It's Like to Be a Dog

By Marc Bekoff Ph.D. on September 15, 2017 in Animal Emotions
New MRI research shows startling similarities in what lights up animals' brains. Dogs, other nonhumans, and humans share neural processes involved in their thoughts and emotions.

Gaydar Goes AI and Populism Comes to Science

An upcoming study on a computer program that categorizes sexual preference from photos has come under fire.

What Does It Take to Survive Emotionally After a Disaster?

Disasters bring out a variety of emotional reactions. New research shows the importance of dealing with your basic emotions in order to insure your long-term emotional survival.

Contagious Yawning is Hard-wired

New research suggests that the propensity for contagious yawning is rooted in the excitation and inhibition of the primary motor cortex.

The Many Ways of Saying, and Hearing, "I'm Sorry"

A recent neuroimaging study demonstrates that the different types of voice information contained in the sentences we speak and hear are processed through different neural pathways.

3 Tips to Donate Effectively After a Natural Disaster

By Utpal Dholakia on September 10, 2017 in The Science Behind Behavior
Giving cash, staggering donations, and vetting the charities you give to will ensure your donation has a greater impact.

Why Your Brain Wants to Take a Break in the Afternoon

By David DiSalvo on September 10, 2017 in Neuronarrative
We all know what it feels like when our brain goes offline in the middle of the afternoon. A new study helps explain what's going on when we just can't focus.

How Speaking a Second Language Affects the Way You Think

By David Ludden Ph.D. on September 09, 2017 in Talking Apes
The effort of speaking a second language impacts decision-making processes, but in unexpected ways.

How Your Brain Makes You Think Expensive Wine Tastes Better

By David DiSalvo on September 08, 2017 in Neuronarrative
Is that $112 bottle of wine really that much better than the $12 bottle? Here's how your brain tricks you into thinking it must be so.

What Would You Rather Tell a Robot Than a Human?

Why might a robot be a better therapist? Research suggests we may prefer to talk to robots about our negative feelings.

The Pitfalls of Popularizing New Science

By Art Markman Ph.D. on September 06, 2017 in Ulterior Motives
I believe that it is important for scientists to popularize psychology. At the same time, I think that there are real dangers in popularizing science.

Can't Do It Perfectly? Just Do It, Badly!

By Christopher Bergland on September 06, 2017 in The Athlete's Way
Most of us have a fear of failure. New research suggests that lowering expectations and vowing to "Just Do It, Badly" is a motto that can help you overcome performance anxiety.

Can Two Narcissists Ever Really Fall in Love?

It’s a well-known fact in the psychology of relationships that like really does attract like. New personality research shows that narcissism follows the same assortment pattern.

Racism Hides Behind The Small Things People Say And Do

By Monnica T Williams Ph.D. on September 04, 2017 in Culturally Speaking
New research finds that White college students who engage in microaggressions are more likely to have racist attitudes.

Five Things Transgender Kids Want Adults to Know

By Jack Turban MD MHS on September 03, 2017 in Political Minds
Adults on both sides on the aisle have argued passionately about how trans youth should be treated. Lost among these voices are those of the children themselves.

The Link Between Sugar And Depression: What You Should Know

By David DiSalvo on September 02, 2017 in Neuronarrative
The connection between excess sugar and depression is becoming increasingly clear.

Four Ways to Build a Stronger and Longer Relationship

Good relationships aren’t just born, but have to mature over time. The newest research reveals that the relationships which are most successful involve shared mutual goals.

Why We Forget Names (But Not Faces)

By David Ludden Ph.D. on September 02, 2017 in Talking Apes
Humans are quite good at recognizing familiar faces, but we often fail to remember even familiar names.

Mindfulness Therapy Could Help ADHD, Studies Suggest

By Marlynn Wei M.D., J.D. on August 31, 2017 in Urban Survival
New studies suggest an important role for mindfulness cognitive behavioral therapy in ADHD treatment.

This Is Your Brain on First Grade

By Lydia Denworth on August 30, 2017 in Brain Waves
When kids start grade school, they have to learn to sit still and pay attention. That experience helps them develop better executive functioning.

The Psychology of Political Violence

Political violence has its roots in anger, contempt, and disgust; three emotions familiar to all of us. Maintaining our civic values requires avoiding the impulse to dehumanize.

Being Busy Is a New Status Symbol

Friends saying they're always busy? They may just be flaunting their status.

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