News

Cognitive Benefits of Exercise Outshine Brain-Training Games

There is growing evidence that physical activity is more effective than sedentary "brain-training" games for maintaining robust cognitive function and "working memory" as we age.

Research Shows What Makes Trolls Tick on Mobile Dating Apps

By Grant H. Brenner M.D. on April 25, 2017 in ExperiMentations
Internet trolls are everywhere. What draws them to dating apps and how can you deal with them?

Five Ways to Fit in with Just About Any Crowd

There are times for individuality but other times when you want to blend into the crowd. New research on conformity and mental health suggests how to gain acceptance.

Femme Fatale: Sexy Women Sway Men to Do Bad Things

Do sexy women send a man's moral compass haywire? New research shows that exposure to sexy images makes a man more likely to cheat, lie, and steal.

Income Inequality Itself Doesn't Make People Unhappy

By Jesse Marczyk Ph.D. on April 24, 2017 in Pop Psych
Despite the focus on inequality as a driver of human unhappiness, the reverse seems to be true. Inequality is either related to increased satisfaction, or no relationship exists.

Did Trump’s Election Make Men More Aggressive?

Research is finding that overtly sexist, aggressive attitudes and behavior towards women appears to be increasing post-election.

Need a Midday Energy Boost? Skip the Caffeine, Take a Walk

Brief bouts of low-to-moderate intensity physical activity are more energizing than a 50 mg dose of caffeine (such as a can of soda or shot of espresso), according to a new study.

Treating Depression by Training Your Amygdala

A recent study indicates that increasing activity in the amygdala during positive memory retrieval can have a strong antidepressant effect in depressed individuals.
Lev Radin/Shutterstock.com

Shrinks Define Dangers of Trump Presidency

By Hara Estroff Marano on April 20, 2017 in Brainstorm
At a conference at Yale, psychiatrists and psychologists begin carving out a new role to combat the gaslighting of America by Donald Trump.

Does Legalized Marijuana Result in More Teen Use?

Dueling data about whether or not legal marijuana increases teen use has led to a lot of confusion and scientific cherry picking.

After the Terrorist Attack

By Romeo Vitelli Ph.D. on April 19, 2017 in Media Spotlight
A new study published in the International Journal of Stress Management examines some of the coping styles used in dealing with the daily threat of terrorism

Train Too Much and a Dog Won't Remember

Back to back training sessions involving different tasks impairs a dog's long-term memory of what he has learned

How Do Character Strengths Help (and Harm) Romance?

By Todd B. Kashdan Ph.D. on April 18, 2017 in Curious?
This is the first study to suggests that the beliefs we hold about the personality strengths of our romantic partners influence our well-being and their well-being.

How to Have a Successful First Date (After Meeting Online)

By Grant H. Brenner M.D. on April 18, 2017 in ExperiMentations
Online dating is increasingly popular, and notoriously unsatisfying for many. Research is beginning to sort out what works—simple steps can help a first date go better.

Are the Hormones of Couples in Sync?

By Darby Saxbe Ph.D. on April 17, 2017 in Home Base
Couples can get under each others' skin, literally. Partners appear to synchronize their stress and reproductive hormone levels over time.

Imagination Helps You Be Patient

A new study finds that imagination trumps willpower when it comes to waiting for bigger payoffs — but is choosing to wait for a larger reward always in your best interest?

Are Romantic Relationships Good for Your Self-Esteem?

By Bella DePaulo Ph.D. on April 16, 2017 in Living Single
What is the link between self-esteem and romantic relationships? A 3-year study of more than 9,000 people offers some surprising answers as well as some obvious ones.

How to Stand up to the People Who Step All Over You

In ordinary social interactions, there’s the expectation that you respect boundaries. A new article suggests what to do when your boundaries are violated.

Note to Self: It Is Easiest to Avoid Abstract Temptations

By Art Markman Ph.D. on April 14, 2017 in Ulterior Motives
Which would you rather have, a dessert or a mouthwatering warm chocolate chip cookie?

Is Yoga an Effective Antidepressant?

By Linda Wasmer Andrews on April 14, 2017 in Minding the Body
Yoga contains at least four “active ingredients” that could help it work as an antidepressant, says yoga researcher and integrative psychiatrist Dr. Sudha Prathikanti.

Coincidence in Politics: All the President’s Men

A series of similar, low-probability events involving the Trump presidential campaign demonstrate how coincidences can be analyzed objectively.

Yoga Could Help Relieve Depression, Study Suggests

By Marlynn Wei M.D., J.D. on April 13, 2017 in Urban Survival
New research finds promising results for yoga in the treatment of depression.

A Wide Range of Mental Disorders May Have Link to Cerebellum

A first-of-its-kind study from Duke University has identified a previously unknown link between the cerebellum (Latin for "little brain") and multiple mental health disorders.

Here Comes the iGen—and Businesses Can Rejoice

iGen and Millennials are actually less entrepreneurial -- and that's a good thing for managers

These 5 Life Skills Boost Well-Being as We Age, Study Finds

A new study identifies 5 life skills correlated with increased psychological, physical, and fiscal well-being. Notably, each of these life skills was found to be equally important.

9 Ways to Test and Improve Your Emotional Control

One of the key features of human relationships is the ability to regulate your emotional expression. A new tool for measuring 9 emotion regulation methods provides important tips.
Twinsterphoto/Shutterstock.com

Mental Health in the Workplace

Think employee recognition doesn't matter? Think again.

Intermittent Fasting for Weight Loss and Other Benefits

In recent years, interest in intermittent fasting—that is, not eating at all for a certain number of days per week—has been increasing.

Speeding Up Your Creativity by Slowing Down

New research on making creative headway through attentive looking

The Two Faces of Narcissism in Romantic Relationships

Narcissists are attractive in the short-run but in long-term, their grandiosity leads to problems. New research shows how narcissism’s two faces predict relationship quality.

Pages