Essential Reads

Cognitive Benefits of Exercise Outshine Brain-Training Games

There is growing evidence that physical activity is more effective than sedentary "brain-training" games for maintaining robust cognitive function and "working memory" as we age.

Intelligence, Education, Personality, and Social Mobility

By Michael Hogan Ph.D. on April 21, 2017 in In One Lifespan
What predicts upward social mobility? We identified four important factors—education, intelligence, higher openness and lower neuroticism.

Why Do Millennials Get a Bad Rap?

Maybe it is just a failure of generativity.

What We Know About Aging and Pain

Older adults experience pain at higher rates that the rest of the population. But exploring a range of treatment options can help.

More Posts on Aging

Cultivating the Pasture They Put You Out To

The question is whether any further investment is worth the effort given the lifespan one foresees.

Closing: Aging, Luck, Hypocrisy

By Marty Nemko Ph.D. on April 24, 2017 in How To Do Life
A short-short story about aging, luck, and hypocrisy.

Time for a Better Approach to Alzheimer’s Treatments

Alzheimer’s can be prevented and mild cognitive impairment can be reversed by addressing these factors in at-risk individuals. Science has moved past the “one-pill-for-every-ill”.
unsplash.com/pexels.com

Is Trazodone the New Brain Wonder Drug?

Will an old, cheap drug end Alzheimer's?

Why it Pays to Be Rich (in More Ways Than One)

Rich Americans continue to live longer. And this means they collect more government benefits. What should we do about it?

Are You Confusing Love With Something Else?

As parents we want to hold onto the illusion that we can fix or control our children. We cannot fix or control them; it is an illusion.

The Secret of Handling Anger and Aggression

Why is anger such an accelerator of aging?

The Courage of Bob

By Greg O'Brien on April 17, 2017 in On Pluto
At 78, there are a lot of miles on Bob Bertschy, who, as a lanky young ballplayer, crouched behind home plate, wearing the “tools of ignorance,” as a catcher with the LA Dodgers.

Relationships, the Key to Life

Thanks to the internet and media, we are bombarded with examples of self-centeredness every day.

"Should I Kill Myself?"

By Marty Nemko Ph.D. on April 16, 2017 in How To Do Life
A short-short story
Lori Russell-Chapin

Does Neurocounseling Education Impact Age Differently?

By Lori Russell-Chapin Ph.D. on April 15, 2017 in Brain Waves
Is it possible that neurocounseling and bridging brain and behavior can help us live more effectively and be helpful for any age group?

Aging and Depression

By Roberta Satow Ph.D. on April 15, 2017 in Life After 50
Is getting old getting you down? Distinguishing between sadness and depression.

How We Handle Stress Predicts How Well We Age

Researchers view stress — how much we face and how well we cope with it — as the most significant factors for predicting how well we age.

The New and Improved Third Act of Life

By Lawrence R Samuel Ph.D. on April 13, 2017 in Boomers 3.0
Rather than embrace their parents’ model of seniority defined by retirement, baby boomers are now pursuing many different options, a version of life I call Boomers 3.0.

How to Live 7.2 (Happy) Years Longer

Positive psychology research consistently shows that happiness is linked to longevity even after accounting for initial health, obesity and socio demographic factors.

What Do the Latest Plastic Surgery Statistics Say About Us?

In 2016, Americans spent more money on elective plastic surgery and non-invasive cosmetic treatments than at any other time in our nation's history. What exactly are we "fixing"?

I Have Cancer and Maybe a Year to Live

By Bernard L. De Koven on April 10, 2017 in On Having Fun
If you want to do something for me or because of me, grieving is not what I need. I need you to play.

Can Videogames Prevent Elderly Falls?

By Toby Ellmers on April 08, 2017 in Aging Brain, Aging Body
Are videogames the key for preventing falls in the elderly? Research reveals the hidden benefits of gaming.

The Gift

By Marty Nemko Ph.D. on April 06, 2017 in How To Do Life
A short-short story on sacrifice.

When Our Chronically Ill Bodies Say “Rest,” Why Don't We?

Most people who are chronically ill (which includes chronic pain) benefit from scheduling at least one rest period into their day because it helps keep symptoms from flaring.
Matthew Mendoza, used with permission

A Collection of Last Words

The many ways to say goodbye.

7 Secrets to a Successful Relationship After 50

Do you feel that your partner truly hears you, sees you, and accepts you as you are and that he or she wants the best for you?

Growing Old in Ancient Greece and Rome

Is past prologue? Part 2 of our exploration of aging in past cultures.

The Drug Industry Against Dementia

By Mario D Garrett Ph.D. on April 01, 2017 in iAge
Who's running the show in dementia treatment? Would a cure make more money?

My Fifties, My Sixties...My Super New Job!

By Dawn R. Norris, Ph.D. on March 30, 2017 in The Next Step
Can being an older job seeker actually help recharge your job search?
“237/365 Bittersweet [explored]” by martinak15 is licensed under CC BY 2.0

When We Feel the Tears of Blessedness, We Feel Alive

This happy/sad blend can be called poignancy. It is the bittersweet state we have all felt when a joyous but fleeting thing happens.

Out of Work...at My Age

By Dawn R. Norris, Ph.D. on March 26, 2017 in The Next Step
Are there ways to think about age that help us get through unemployment?

The Woman Who Does it All

Women seem to hold up the world. Is this an identity, a self-created fate, or a default position when men in our lives do less than their share?

Growing Old in Ancient Cultures

What can Ancient Egypt, India and China teach us about aging well?

Ginkgo Biloba for Mild to Moderate Dementia

If you or a loved one are thinking about trying Ginkgo for a memory problem, first review the evidence. Findings for Ginkgo in dementia are inconsistent.