Essential Reads

Love and Exile: Decoding the Many Rules of the Girl Code

By Jen Kim on April 24, 2017 in Valley Girl With a Brain
What do women want from their female friendships? Decoding the rules of the Girl Code.

Femme Fatale: Sexy Women Sway Men to Do Bad Things

Do sexy women send a man's moral compass haywire? New research shows that exposure to sexy images makes a man more likely to cheat, lie, and steal.

The Science of Religion for Everyone

Why insist that religion is immune from scientific study when cognitive and evolutionary theories have already made great strides in explaining a wide array of religious phenomena?

Helping Your Neighbor

We often help others with expectations of help in return at a future point. Turns out, this is a basic feature of what it means to be human.

More Posts on Evolutionary Psychology

When Should You Go With Your Intuitions?

Do you trust your gut? Going with your intuitions can be dangerous in some situations. This article helps you see when you should go with your gut, and when you shouldn't.

The Psychological Purpose of Religion

By Nigel Barber Ph.D. on April 25, 2017 in The Human Beast
Religion consumes up to a tenth of economic productivity in some societies. So it must produce corresponding benefits. What are they?

What Men Desire In a Woman

By Adrian Furnham Ph.D. on April 25, 2017 in A Sideways View
What is the evolutionary psychology of mate choice? What really "turns men on" and why?

Morality: Seeds Must Be Planted Rightly in Early LIfe

By Darcia Narvaez Ph.D. on April 23, 2017 in Moral Landscapes
It’s easy to believe that reasoning is the most important aspect of morality. But it isn't. Morality "goes all the way down" to how well our neurobiological systems work.

Imprinting and the Epigenetics of the Brain and Sleep

One of the best-understood epigenetic mechanisms—genomic imprinting—explains much about both sleep and the brain.

The Rise and Fall of Monogamy

By Neel Burton M.D. on April 19, 2017 in Hide and Seek
What future for monogamy and polyamory?

How Men Attract Women

By Nigel Barber Ph.D. on April 18, 2017 in The Human Beast
How men attract women is a much more difficult question than vice-versa because women are both more selective, and also more individualistic in what they want.

Why Are We All so frightened?

By Gary L. Wenk Ph.D. on April 16, 2017 in Your Brain on Food
Humans fear everything that is unfamiliar or not-like-me: we fear unfamiliar dogs, people who look or dress differently, unfamiliar places, things that go bump in the night, etc.

How Universal Is Body Language?

By Romeo Vitelli Ph.D. on April 12, 2017 in Media Spotlight
Are emotional signals shaped by different cultures or are they universal to all humans? An ambitious new research project seeks to answer that question,

The "Guilty Dog" Look and Other Borrowed Signals

The guilty dog look and the human handshake have similar roots in the evolution of animal communication.

The Nature of a Dog's Eye Can Make Problem-Solving Difficult

Dogs have limited visual abilities when compared to humans, and this may make solving certain problems difficult.

Estrogen Promise

By Robert J King Ph.D. on April 11, 2017 in Hive Mind
Have the rumors of the death of testosterone been somewhat exaggerated? In a word: Yes.

We Are Programmed for Fairness

By Arthur Dobrin D.S.W. on April 07, 2017 in Am I Right?
You know when you're not treated fairly; it's built into your biology.

Hope

Hope remains, psychologically, a paradoxical mental phenomenon.

Semen Quality and the Menstrual Cycle

By Jesse Marczyk Ph.D. on April 06, 2017 in Pop Psych
Biology is costly, and organisms only invest in it when the probability of returns is deemed high enough

What’s in a Name?

By Molly S. Castelloe Ph.D. on April 05, 2017 in The Me in We
How does one's name influence identity and guide one's destiny?

Consciousness in Other Animals

This post discusses the challenge of determining whether or not the experiences of other organisms have the same phenomenal quality of our typical conscious experiences.

Growing Old in Ancient Greece and Rome

Is past prologue? Part 2 of our exploration of aging in past cultures.

Rage Rooms Not a Good Idea

By Kevin Bennett on March 30, 2017 in Modern Minds
You may think you are expressing anger in a safe and constructive way when you punch a pillow, stomp on a doll, or enter a rage room, but research suggests otherwise.

5 Sources of Stress and Anxiety in the Modern World

Are you stressed out or anxious about too many parts of your life? The modern world might be to blame.

Why Do Dogs React to Cats?

Is it the sight of the cat, the sound of a cat, or the smell of a cat that excites dogs the most? The answer might surprise you.
Hydra: Wikipedia commons

Why Do We Die?

By Thomas Hills Ph.D. on March 18, 2017 in Statistical Life
Our survivability is the bargaining chip that life pays to keep us immortal.

Two-Legged Walking and Human Skull Traits Evolved in Tandem

Our hominid ancestors' ability to walk upright on two legs evolved in tandem with distinctive traits of the human skull, according to a new follow-up study.

The Better Angels of Our Nature

By Hank Davis on March 14, 2017 in Caveman Logic
It sometimes seems impossible to find those "better angels" inside ourselves and resist the lure of of meanness and bigotry that's all around us.
By Tkgd2007 - https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Human_evolution.svg?uselang=en-gb, CC BY-SA 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=53150354

Evolutionary Psychology Applies to Everyone

Can understanding our evolutionary history help us better function in the contemporary environment? Absolutely!

On Criminology and Politics in the Social Sciences

By Clay Routledge Ph.D. on March 09, 2017 in More Than Mortal
A biosocial criminologist's thoughts on the state of his field, professional challenges, and ideological bias within the social sciences.

Can Modern People Survive in the Wild?

By Nigel Barber Ph.D. on March 09, 2017 in The Human Beast
The history of European explorers contains nasty stories of intelligent people failing to adapt to harsh new environments. One exception may be Viking colony in Greenland.

Getting Things Done, Procrastinating or Not

Procrastination should not be linked with failure, just as early action should not be tied to success.

Do Dogs Ever Lie to or Try to Deceive People?

New data shows that dogs are capable of being deceptive around people when it is in their own self-interest.