Essential Reads

Being Bayesian in Insane Places

Can we really make progress in improving reliability of detecting problematic psychiatric events using computational tools?

The Question of Contact

By David Kyle Johnson Ph.D. on July 10, 2017 in Plato on Pop
Can personal experience ever be used to justifiably override scientific evidence or argument?

How Do We Handle Religion in Mental Health Settings?

By Jean Kim M.D. on June 27, 2017 in Culture Shrink
What is the best way to handle a client's religious views if they differ from your own?

Differences Between Self-Directed and Progressive Education

By Peter Gray Ph.D. on June 27, 2017 in Freedom to Learn
Self-Directed Education and progressive education both emphasize the education of the whole, unique person, but they differ greatly in how that education is best achieved.

More Posts on Philosophy

Get the Science Right!

What popular books get wrong about human evolution.

Just to Be Safe, Should You Believe in God?

By David Niose on July 16, 2017 in Our Humanity, Naturally
Religious doctrines disagree about who gets eternal bliss. Could it be the atheists?

If Gandhi Was Your Marriage Therapist

Research has found that Gandhi's principles of fairness, peace, and principled protest can also change your love life.
Manu Praba / Wikipedia Commons CC BY 2.0

Be(lie)ve It or Not: Part One

Is belief a psychological condition? Why do we believe what we believe? What does belief mean? Is it many things?
pixabay open source

The Lexicon of Delirium

We must depart from traditional perspectives on delirium that have presented it as an entity without history, and one bordering on a transcendent ideal.
The Meeting of Cortés and Montezuma (detail), from the Conquest of Mexico series, seventeenth century. Jay I. Kislak Collection, Rare Book and Special Collections Division, United States Library of Congress.

Montezuma's Bane (Fake News)

By Chris Kutarna Ph.D. on July 10, 2017 in Age of Discovery
Frustrated by fake news? We've been here before...

Not-So-Leaky Pipelines

By Jesse Marczyk Ph.D. on July 08, 2017 in Pop Psych
Some people think the world of academia is biased against women when it comes to hiring. Turns out just the opposite is true

That’s Awkward

Awkward people are not socially fluent because they are often unable to read social cues and follow social scripts. They may be culpably ignorant but they can be awesome.
CC0 Public Domain; Free for commercial use; No attribution required

Self-Determination Is NOT a Basic Human Right

By Tim Carey Ph.D. on July 05, 2017 in In Control
Life, in fact, for as long as it exists, is an ongoing process of realizing the experiences or outcomes that we have determined must be established.

Why Sorry Seems to Be the Hardest Word

By Neel Burton M.D. on July 05, 2017 in Hide and Seek
The psychology and philosophy of forgiveness.
lechenie-narkomanii/Pixabay

Quiz: Can You Avoid Wrongdoing?

By Lisa Tessman Ph.D. on July 02, 2017 in I'm Only Human
Quizzes on moral decision making seem to offer choices between right and wrong. But what if the choices are really between wrong and wrong?

Varieties of Truth?

We operate with different standards of truth that harden into fixed “positions.” We must subject those standards – our own as well as others’ – to scrutiny.

Running for a Song

How do you write a song? someone asks. I am new to this game, and am almost embarrassed to answer: “I go for a run.”

Everything in the Animal Kingdom Is in a State of Being

In contemporary world culture the philosophical concern of the mystery of both animal being and human being seems to have little credence.

A Short History of Love

By Neel Burton M.D. on June 23, 2017 in Hide and Seek
How love became the new religion.

Our Worst Angels: Inconvenient Psychological Truths, Part 1

By Noam Shpancer Ph.D. on June 22, 2017 in Insight Therapy
What might rappers, gender studies academics, and abusive parents have in common?

Why Is There So Much Violence Today?

How can we get beyond this wave of violence? A new perspective can make all the difference.

National PTSD Awareness Month

By James F. Zender Ph.D. on June 16, 2017 in The New Normal
June is a time to celebrate a psychiatric revolution.

The Self, Lost and Found

How creativity holds up a mirror to your inner world.

Playing to Win: Should Youth Specialize in Sports?

Data show that more youth than ever train year-round for a single sport and travel to compete against higher-level teams. But is this good for kids?

A Possible Sign from God That He (It) Exists

By Izzy Kalman on June 14, 2017 in Resilience to Bullying
Could it be that a familiar cosmic illusion considered by scientists to be a pure coincidence is actually a clever sign from God to mankind that He exists?

My 20-Year Journey Toward a Unified Framework

A retrospective on my work toward a unified framework for psychology and psychotherapy.

The Mind of God

"The Mind of God" is an elegant and wise book that leads us to wonder about and fashion our own unique answers to some of the most baffling and vital of questions.

A Writer's Manifesto

Using words to navigate an incoherent existence

The Three Hounds of Hell

Three forces deplete our well-being and that of our communities and countries.

Why Social Stigma Matters (Children's Edition)

Children are invoking Trump while engaging in bigoted harassment of classmates. What does this tell us about the role the current political climate plays in shaping our behavior?

The End of Guilt

Has shame taken over from guilt as the marker of American culture? Or was guilt never very important in the first place?

How to Protect Yourself Against Pop Inspirational “wisdom"

By Jeremy E Sherman Ph.D. on June 06, 2017 in Ambigamy
Nothing stunts our learning of practical wisdom like embracing half-wit wisdom masquerading as whole, universal wisdom.

The Deep Roots of Left vs. Right

By Jeremy E Sherman Ph.D. on June 05, 2017 in Ambigamy
The fundamental distinction in politics as in life is between constraint and freedom. We need both.

Seeking Common Ground 3: Reasserting the American Commitment

The challenge—for both blue and red—is to abandon the noisy rhetoric and to consider, earnestly, how personal and public good can be integrated.