Essential Reads

Does Testosterone Really Just Make Men Aggressive?

The conventional wisdom about testosterone is that it drives aggressiveness and competition. But new research reveals that social rank is also important.

Social-Emotional Development in a Hyper-Competitive Age

Our current political situation is a logical conclusion of many years of celebrating competition and success that are achieved at the expense of others.

Great Performers Are Born AND Made

By Jim Taylor Ph.D. on June 07, 2017 in The Power of Prime
Different pursuits have specific neurological, physiological, and musculoskeletal requirements and if you're not born with those, all of the training in the world won't help.

Psychology of Peak Performance, Continued

By David Dillard-Wright Ph.D. on June 02, 2017 in Boundless
Endurance athletes teach lessons about mental toughness for everyone.

More Posts on Sport and Competition

Stanford Researchers Identify Life-Changing Power of Mindset

Mindset plays a surprisingly significant role in our health and longevity, according to a new study from Stanford University.

Does Video Game Addiction Really Exist?

By Romeo Vitelli Ph.D. on July 19, 2017 in Media Spotlight
Despite the political pressure to declare video game addiction a real disorder, the basic science still isn't there. What will this mean for concerned parents and therapists?
Pictofigo-Idea/wikimediacommons

The "Lazy" Edge

Setting goals and striving as hard as you can is great—except when it backfires. A paradoxical story within a story illustrates the challenge and points to a solution.

The Teenage Years: 4 Questions That May Predict Thriving

One factor may matter more than you might expect for kids in their teenage years. A recent study from Brazil and Romania has important implications for American teenagers.

At Wimbledon, Grunts May Separate Winners from Losers

Two new studies reaffirm that speaking (or grunting) in a lower pitch voice can make you appear less submissive in daily life and help you perform better in sporting competitions.

New Research Explains Why Some of Us Really Hate to Exercise

A new study suggests that shifting rigid mindsets and stereotypes about what it means to be "athletic" may be the secret to making moderate-intensity exercise actually feel good.

Hunter-gatherer Ancestry May Be Why Our Brains Need Exercise

A radical new evolutionary neuroscience theory may explain how our hunter-gatherer ancestors inadvertently hardwired our modern day brains to thrive on everyday physical activity.

David and Goliath: When Sports Inspire National Pride

By Jenni Ogden Ph.D. on June 26, 2017 in Trouble in Mind
When a small country beats a massive country in sport, we can all take inspiration from that.

Times of Change in College Athletics

By Brian Tompkins on June 26, 2017 in View From The Dugout
When a veteran college coach becomes an administrator, the change in perspective bears similarities to that of a freshman athlete.

Money, Pride, and Injury Risks in Youth Sports

There are too many people focused on making money off of youth sports in the United States, while putting the health and other interests of young athletes at risk.
pixabay, via pexels

How to Win at Sports

Can changing internal temperature make muscles stronger? Can biological clocks make you more fit?

Put Your Own Spin on It

Have you ever wondered just how far to push your body while exercising? Is pain really good for your psyche?
CCO Creative Commons

5 Keys to Making Mental Training like Your Sports Training

By Jim Taylor Ph.D. on June 20, 2017 in The Power of Prime
Despite athletes and coaches saying that the mind is so important, it is the piece of the athletic performance puzzle that is most neglected.

Playing to Win: Should Youth Specialize in Sports?

Data show that more youth than ever train year-round for a single sport and travel to compete against higher-level teams. But is this good for kids?

When Coaching, Not Talent, Wins

By Steven Berglas Ph.D. on June 13, 2017 in Executive Ego
The Warriors' win holds lessons for every executive, basketball fan or not.

Dog Obedience Trials Began Because of Poodles and a Farmer

A woman's desire to prove that Poodles were not stupid useless dogs ultimately gave birth to modern dog obedience trials

6 Ways Public Swimming Pools Have Changed

Gone are the unadorned rectangular pools of yesteryear. Now, public pools are full-fledged aquatic complexes that proffer an immersive experience.

Wonder Woman in the Ring: MMA Fighter Sarah Kaufman

By E. Paul Zehr Ph.D. on May 31, 2017 in Black Belt Brain
Mixed martial arts fighter Sarah Kaufman shares thoughts on life in the ring and the importance of role models like Wonder Woman.

The Psychophysiology of Flow and Your Vagus Nerve

New research offers fresh clues about the psychology and physiological components that come together to create what Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi famously describes as a state "flow."

How Our Body Ages, Part 2

Our heart, lungs, liver and gastrointestinal tract change as we age in ways that may surprise you.

Tonic Levels of Physical Activity Stimulate Your Vagus Nerve

Moderate physical activity is a guaranteed way to engage your vagus nerve and create a "relaxation response" that counters the panic and anxiety of fight-or-flight responses.

Fair Contests Vs. "Fair" (Even) Outcomes

By Jeremy E Sherman Ph.D. on May 17, 2017 in Ambigamy
GOP antics teach key lessons about what fairness really means.

When Discipline Worsens Performance in Competitive Sports

Harsh parenting behaviour burdens the child, hindering performance.

The 80% Edge

We may want to perform at our best, but at times illness, injury, or life events conspire to limit what we can truly expect of ourselves.How then can we maximize our performance?

Psychology of Peak Performance

If you are looking for a competitive edge or trying to find more interest in life, these stories from around the web will get your juices flowing.

Exercise Researchers Find "More Is Better" Mindset Overrated

A new study reports that you don't have to spend hours at the gym—or even break a sweat—to reap psychological benefits from small doses of low intensity, easy physical activity.

Be True to Your School(s)

Sports team loyalties are similar to cultural identities. Sometimes you have more than one.

More Than Just a Pretty Face: Unmasking Furry Fandom

Recent research debunks common misconception of the furry community as a bunch of sexual "deviants" or misfits.

How to Reach Higher Goals by Lowering Your Expectations

By Reid Wilson Ph.D. on May 10, 2017 in All about Anxiety
Paul Hamm had been training for this specific competition for a decade; he was on the road to a gold medal. And after his fall, the way he gets back up is inspirational.

Getting Lost in the Dance

We would all likely to experience FLOW on a more regular basis. A few easy ideas may help.