So, here's the ACTUAL analysis of NESARC findings. They indicate that DR. Peele has been manipulating and massaging them to trash AA when they show the opposite. And, he trashes Ms. Rettenberg, whose 20 years of experience are consistent, albeit not identical:
Takeaway: "CONCLUSIONS: Abstinence represents the most stable form of remission for most recovering alcoholics. Study findings highlight the need for better approaches to maintaining recovery among young adults in remission from alcohol dependence, who are at particularly high risk of relapse."
and: "CONCLUSIONS: Help-seeking plays a significant role in the achievement of abstinent recovery from alcohol dependence, with 12-Step participation playing a major role. Appropriate model selection is critical to assessing the impact of help-seeking."

"Alcohol Clin Exp Res. 2007 Dec;31(12):2036-45.
Rates and correlates of relapse among individuals in remission from DSM-IV alcohol dependence: a 3-year follow-up.
Dawson DA, Goldstein RB, Grant BF.
SourceLaboratory of Epidemiology and Biometry, Division of Clinical and Biological Research, National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland 20892-9304, USA. ddawson@mail.nih.gov

Abstract
BACKGROUND: There is little information on the stability of abstinent and nonabstinent remission from alcohol dependence in the general U.S. population. The aim of this study was to examine longitudinal changes in recovery status among individuals in remission from DSM-IV alcohol dependence, including rates and correlates of relapse, over a 3-year period.

METHODS: This analysis is based on data from Waves 1 and 2 of the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions (NESARC), a nationally representative sample of U.S. adults aged 18 years and older originally interviewed in 2001 to 2002 and reinterviewed in 2004 to 2005. The Wave 1 NESARC identified 2,109 individuals who met the DSM-IV criteria for full remission from alcohol dependence. Of these, 1,772 were reinterviewed at Wave 2, comprising the analytic sample for this study. Recovery status at Wave 2 was examined as a function of type of remission at Wave 1, with a focus on rates of relapse, alternately defined as recurrence of any alcohol use disorder (AUD) symptoms and recurrence of DSM-IV alcohol dependence. Logistic regression models were used to estimate the odds of relapse among asymptomatic risk drinkers and low-risk drinkers relative to abstainers, adjusted for a wide range of potential confounders.

RESULTS: By Wave 2, 51.0% of the Wave 1 asymptomatic risk drinkers had experienced the recurrence of AUD symptoms, compared with 27.2% of low-risk drinkers and 7.3% of abstainers. Across all ages combined, the adjusted odds of recurrence of AUD symptoms relative to abstainers were 14.6 times as great for asymptomatic risk drinkers and 5.8 times as great for low-risk drinkers. The proportions of individuals who had experienced the recurrence of dependence were 10.2, 4.0, and 2.9%, respectively, and the adjusted odds ratios relative to abstainers were 7.0 for asymptomatic risk drinkers and 3.0 for low-risk drinkers. Age significantly modified the association between type of remission and relapse. Differences by type of remission were not significant for younger alcoholics, who had the highest rates of relapse.

CONCLUSIONS: Abstinence represents the most stable form of remission for most recovering alcoholics. Study findings highlight the need for better approaches to maintaining recovery among young adults in remission from alcohol dependence, who are at particularly high risk of relapse.

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Addiction. 2006 Jun;101(6):824-34.
Estimating the effect of help-seeking on achieving recovery from alcohol dependence.
Dawson DA, Grant BF, Stinson FS, Chou PS.
SourceLaboratory of Epidemiology and Biometry, Division of Intramural Clinical and Biological Research, National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA. ddawson@mail.nih.gov

Abstract
AIMS: To investigate the effect of help-seeking on the likelihood of recovery from Diagnostic and Statistical Manual version IV (DSM-IV) alcohol dependence, specifically examining the impact of model selection, factors that moderate the effect of help-seeking and distinctions between the effects of 12-Step participation and formal treatment.

DESIGN: This analysis is based on data from the Wave 1 2001-02 National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions (NESARC), a cross-sectional, retrospective survey of a nationally representative sample of US adults 18 years of age and over. The analytical sample consisted of 4422 individuals with prior-to-past-year (PPY) onset of DSM-IV alcohol dependence.

METHODS: Logistic regression, proportional hazards and time-dependent proportional hazards models were used to estimate the effects of help-seeking on three outcomes: (1) any recovery from alcohol dependence, which required full remission of all symptoms of alcohol abuse and dependence and excluded asymptomatic drinkers whose alcohol consumption exceeded low-risk drinking guidelines; (2) non-abstinent recovery (NR), representing low-risk asymptomatic drinkers; and (3) abstinent recovery (AR), representing abstainers.

FINDINGS: Only one-quarter of individuals with PPY-onset alcohol dependence had ever sought help for alcohol problems, including 3.1% who had participated in 12-Step programs only, 5.4% who had received formal treatment only and 17.0% with both 12-Step and formal treatment. Based on the most appropriate model, help-seeking increased the likelihood of any recovery [hazard rate ratio (HRR) = 2.38], NR (HRR = 1.50) and AR (HRR = 4.01). The impact of help-seeking on AR did not show any significant variation across the exposure period but was modified by severity among other factors. Individuals who participated in 12-Step programs in addition to formal treatment had almost twice the chance of recovery and more than more than twice the chance of AR compared with those who received formal treatment alone.

CONCLUSIONS: Help-seeking plays a significant role in the achievement of abstinent recovery from alcohol dependence, with 12-Step participation playing a major role. Appropriate model selection is critical to assessing the impact of help-seeking.
"

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